Festival must-haves -the Wash Wizard

We’ve just had this intriguing parcel arrive through the post – a Wash Wizard!

Wash Wizard.jpgAs avid festival goers, the showering situation is always something at the forefront of our minds, particularly with a small son who is permanently sticky. At the festivals we’ve been to, there’s either no showers, or a massive queue to use them. We usually have a kind of blanket bath using a bowl, soap and a microfibre cloth.

So I was fascinated by The Wash Wizard. It’s a complete body wash sponge to which you just add a drop of water. This activates the aloe vera foam, and  the natural ingredients mean you can just air dry!

The young founders of the company say: “No more queuing at grim public showers with 500 other people, or, worse, discovering there are no showers.  Liberate yourself from soap, towels and the need for running water, simply pack your Wash Wizard, safe in the knowledge that you can be shower fresh within minutes, wherever you are. So, if you’re working out in the wilderness, off to a festival, camping, or travelling to the middle of nowhere with just a rucksack, wave goodbye to soap, towels and running water and say hello to Wash Wizard, the new way to shower without actually showering.”

Wash Wizard is hypoallergenic and fragrance free, and completely green and recyclable. RRP £7.99 is for five sponges, with a percentage of the profits going to charities for the homeless.  Available from amazon.co.uk

 For more information go to www.wash-wizard.co.uk

Belonging(s)

We missed the beginning but saw an unusual balletic performance at Greenham Business Park yesterday courtesy of 101 Outdoor Arts.

Fortunately it was a beautiful hot day as the audience moved with the cast who used the outdoor and indoor spaces on the business park to create a remarkable piece about belongings, belonging and the transient nature of everything that surrounds us. Awesome stuff.

#belongings2017

National Fudge Day (16th June 2017)

Happy National Fudge Day!

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There are all kind of weird and wonderful awareness days out there – so what’s different about National Fudge Day?  Well, as well as a day created for you to indulge guilt-free in a fantastic treat, there’s a lot to love about fudge – there are flavours of all kinds. You can buy it here or you can make your own. It’s a great gift and it is bound to put a smile on someone’s face just by mentioning it.

On a slightly more serious note, it also tends to be handmade and companies that make it stick to the traditional recipes and methods.  Buttermilk Fudge in Cornwall uses a recipe created way back that uses copper pans and ingredients are sourced locally where possible. When you think about manufacturing in this country, you tend to think of steel and consumer products, but don’t forget that there is a base devoted to this fabulous treat!

 

http://www.buttermilk.co.uk

The world’s biggest tunnel slide

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“It’s not scary”, said the woman who helped me get into the mat/sleeping bag as the woman in front of me shrieked her way down.

To mark another successful journey around the sun (in other words, my birthday) I thought I’d celebrate by having a go on the world’s biggest slide at the Arcelor Mittal Orbit at London’s Olympic Park. Having worked on a project that meant I saw the slide being built had whetted my appetite and was also strangely reassuring when it came to the safety and solidity aspect!

So the day of the slide came and I turned up at Stratford East station, realising that for some reason I was wearing a skirt. I tried to nip into one of the clothes shops to get some trousers, but either everyone had the same problem as me, or it was a standard Saturday and it was crazily busy.

Time was ticking by and I now needed to run to the tower to get to my turn at 5pm. You have your bags searched, naturally, and then the receptionist explains that you can put your stuff in a locker and go straight up, or you can get the lift to the top floor, have a look round and then come back down before heading back up again. Makes sense?

 

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I recommend that you do have alook at the top, with phone in hand, as the views extend about 20 miles and you get a good view of Canary Wharf, central London and of the aquatics centre and Olympic stadium.  You can also see people begin their descent – either by slide or abseil!

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You then queue up and there’s an expectant chatter while you wait, punctuated every minute or so by someone screaming their way down the slide.  It’s pretty much how I imagine a labour ward to be.

You get a helmet, or sorts which will make you look like Ron Weasley off to play Quidditch, plus arm protectors if you are so absorbed with remembering to wear trousers that you forget to wear long sleeves. (I forgot this too).

You inch to the top of the slide, and there’s a screen showing happy people emerge at the bottom of the chute (I said it was like a labour ward, didn’t I?). But for now, you have to prepare yourself for the descent. You get into what looks like the tray leading up to the airport luggage scanner where the staff unfurl a mat that has a pocket for your feet. You grab the handles, scooch into position and then get pushed!

WAAAHHOOOOOOOOOOO!

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I congratulated myself on not screaming, but the speed is immense and as I whizzed and careered round corners in and out of the dark, I did let out some involuntary squeals. It’s over in just 34 seconds, but it’s such an adrenaline ride. I’ll be back soon, but sadly for a very excited small son, you need to be 8 years old to ride.

http://arcelormittalorbit.com/whats-on/the-slide/

Video here: http://arcelormittalorbit.com/whats-on/the-slide/

 

Newbury lido opening for 2017!

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In a week of rubbish news, I’m cheered (and literally cheering!) to see that Newbury’s fine 75m lido is opening on Friday for the season!

I honestly thought we had weeks, if not months, to wait, so this is great news. This is a great facility and apparently the biggest lido in Berkshire (it may even be the only lido in Berkshire!).

See you on Friday at 7.15!

 

World Pooh Sticks Championships

“And that was the beginning of the game called Poohsticks, which Pooh invented, and which he and his friends used to play on the edge of the Forest.  But they played with sticks instead of fir-cones, because they were easier to mark.”
The House at Pooh Corner

 

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Wouldn’t it be great to be world champion at something by the age of five. This was what I was thinking as we arrived at the World Pooh Sticks Championships on Sunday having done no training whatsoever.

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Held annually to raise money for the Rotary Club of Oxford Spires, the event was held this year in Witney, a stone’s throw from the town centre. With the team event taking place first, we watched for a while before signing up small son for the individual event and helping him choose a coloured stick.

Husband’s tip was to go for the heaviest, but small son completely ignored him as he was too busy asking if he could splat the rat or go on the bouncy castle. There was live music too and a beer tent, but we were not to be distracted!  We were in the first event and our yellow stick lined up against purple, blue, white and others.  Small son dropped the stick and we dashed to the other side to peer into the water.  We got there before our stick, to watch it dawdle out and cross the finish line in third place.

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So our dreams were quashed, but we’re looking to the future and have our sights now set on the World Nettle Eating Championships in Dorset. These usually take place in June, but are likely to be held in July or August this year, giving us plenty of time to get training!

All was not lost at Pooh Sticks as small son did  finally get his go on the bouncy castle and also got to meet one of his heroes, Ben Fogle, who also failed to qualify for round 2 of Pooh Sticks!  (Ben pictured below in the blue top!)

 

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How to choose your hat for Ascot

*This is a repost of an article we did a couple of years ago

HOW TO GET AHEAD WITH A HAT BY BOXFORD MILLINER EMMA MOSCOW

Looking to turn heads on Ladies Day at Ascot? Searching for that extra special something to finish off a stunning wedding outfit?

Having learned the art of hat-making from the Queen Mother’s milliner Rose Cory, Emma Moscow has the experience to help you choose the right hat for any occasion and put you ahead of the game.

From school, Emma studied fashion at Berkshire College of Art and Design. However, her career took a very different turn when she ran her own homeopathy business for 17 years. Realising the time was right for a change and a more creative career, she revisited her passion for fashion and decided to specialise in hats. She studied with Rose Cory and subsequently launched her own business three years ago.

Most of her custom comes from word-of-mouth referrals who turn to her for bespoke couture hats and headpieces for special occasions. She also finds the time to provide the headgear for the Boxford Masques.

Each hat is unique and handcrafted using traditional techniques from different materials such as parasisal straw, sinamay, fur and wool felt and fabric.

She said: “I invite customers to my workshop so they can have a look at the hats on display, and I get to know them so I can create something that will really suit them. I want them to commission something they’ll really love as there’s no better feeling than seeing a customer being happy and confident in their hat.”

You might think anything goes hat-wise during the race season but there are some rules to remember. Some racecourses stipulate that the headwear must cover a circumference of 4inch of the wearer’s head. Others state that “the customisation of top hats is forbidden”.

“If you are looking for ‘that’ hat on Ladies Day you need to make a statement. Choose something eye-catching, but you must keep it stylish,” says Emma. “A hat says a lot about your personality as well as a great way to finish off an outfit,” she adds.

Here are Emma’s top tips for choosing the right hat:
• Always try to take your outfit with you and leave yourself plenty of time to try the hats on.

• There are no hard and fast rules about what shapes will suit a certain person. There are many factors that affect how a shape looks such as shape and size of face, hairstyle, height and length of neck, so be open minded and try lots of shapes. They often look quite different on the head from on the stand.

• Consider the occasion. For example, if you are meeting and greeting people and going to be photographed a lot then it is probably best to avoid a large down turned brim, or if it is likely to be windy, avoid a hat that is too tall.

• Generally the taller you are, the wider the brim you can wear successfully but it is probably wise not to go much wider than your shoulder width, or it will start to look unbalanced. Smaller people are often better with small brims or hats/headdresses worn on the side of the head.

• If you want your hat to be the same colour as your outfit then make sure it is a good match. Otherwise go for a complementary or accent colour.

• A good fit is very important. If a hat is much too big or small it will look wrong and be uncomfortable. Made-to-measure is ideal for this. It is also important that it is secure, you don’t want to be having to grab your hat every time you move or there is a breeze.

• Pay attention to how you wear the hat. It is common for people to push their hats too far back. Generally they look much better tilted forward. Wearing them at an angle, usually down over the right eyebrow looks very flattering on most people.

For more information visit http://www.emmamoscowmillinery.co.uk

Our lido tour visits Chesham, Woodstock and Chipping Norton

At last, the sun has got its hat on, hip hip hip hooray!

Not that we need to wait for the sun to shine before we visit an outdoor pool, of course.  With work and life in general taking over, our visits have been relegated to the weekend; it’s criminal isn’t it, to be sitting in an office while it’s sunny outside and you should be in a pool somewhere.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 20.06.39.pngOur first trip of the three was to Chesham.  A welcoming receptionist told us that we could get in for FREE! I thought it was because we used to live in Chesham and they were delighted that we had returned but in fact it was their open day.  Ten minutes earlier, and we would have also enjoyed a free barbecue. Gah.

Despite the lovely sunshine, it wasn’t too busy. The inflatable was coming down so the children were leaving and I did 66 lengths which I think was about a mile as it seems to be a 25m pool. Changing rooms are a bit open plan although there are some curtained changing rooms.

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Next we went to Woodstock. Again, it was a boiling hot day, and our original target was Hinksey Outdoor Pool in Oxford where we always find it difficult to park, and indeed to even get in to the pool itself if it’s a busy day.

So we looked harder and found Woodstock. We didn’t even know about this as Woodstock isn’t quite as prolific as Hinksey on social media, so we arrived on a hot day to find FIVE people there. Five! And two of them were lifeguards.

Like Chesham, it’s not much to look at from the outside, but parking was free. It was about £7 for small son and I to get in. We weren’t impressed by the changing rooms, or more specifically, the toilets – yuk. But the pool was great; clean and surprisingly deep. Again, it’s basic, but what do you need apart from water?  It does have plenty of grass areas AND a diving board. I was really delighted to see that the staff were extremely friendly, and greeted all of the regulars by name, as well as giving them a cheery bye as they left.  I didn’t manage my customary mile in this pool as I had small son with me, but he did a width!

 

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Then today’s visit was to  Chipping Norton Lido, or Chippy Lido as it’s known by the community. And community is important here – the pool is run by the community and pleasingly, it’s heated by solar power.

It’s set in the middle of a housing estate and as you pass through two lines of parked cars, thinking it can’t possibly be here, keep going – you’ll see a sign saying ‘swimming pool’ in a minute.

Parking is free again here, and as with the previous two, it looks like an old working men’s club from the outside. It cost me £4.25 to get in and the lad behind the desk was extremely pleased that I paid the correct amount. The first thing I noticed EVERYWHERE were the “no photography” signs. I understand why they need to do this – but modern life dictates that it’s almost impossible to police. You need to get a form filled in. Seems a bit silly to me.

The changing room were meh and I almost cried when the toilet brush and holder complete with contents FELL on me in the toilet. Why it was on the window sill, I don’t know, but I emerged covered in who-knows-what. Well, we know exactly what, don’t we?

The pool has a beautiful, but faded cafe next to it and a lovely wooded area. I’d timed my visit to coincide with the adult swim – why then were there no lanes? There were only about 10 people in the pool, but as we were all competing for space to swim up and down, it seemed crowded.

The pool itself is pretty standard and for some reason (air bubbles according to the facebook page), it was quite murky. However, a slide hugely redeems it, and the lifeguard laughed and turned the water on when I asked if I could have a go. It’s small, but fast and with a massive smile on my face, I returned for a few more goes; no elegant ladylike swimming for me!

 

 

Hoarding awareness week – 15th to 19th May

To mark Hoarding Awareness Week, a new book has been published on the subject by a Newbury author

A comprehensive guide to hoarding has received an official launch at Broadway House in Newbury this week.

The book, Understanding Hoarding, has been written by Jo Cooke from Thatcham. She runs a decluttering company and co-founded a Community Interest Company called Hoarding Disorders UK in 2014.

Mrs Cooke has used her extensive experience to collect case studies and suggest practical ways of helping hoarders and their families. The book covers every aspect of hoarding disorder from the factors that trigger it to who can help a hoarder and how.

Chapters in the book include case histories, useful information and tips, plus how to assess the level of clutter. Uniquely, the book also shows how therapies such as emotional freedom technique, also known as ‘tapping’ can help.

Jo said: “Thanks to everyone who attended the launch – industry professionals and people with an interest in the subject matter. I hope this book will raise awareness of hoarding and provide not only a better understanding of the condition but also tools and techniques for those wanting to help. I also hope to reduce the stigma surrounding hoarding. While I find it enjoyable and satisfying to work with people who hoard, I want to be able to help them to come forward without feeling that they will be judged and subjected to a forced clear out without their consent. It’s important that people should feel free to ask for help, not to have it forced upon them.”

“Understanding Hoarding” by Jo Cooke will be published by Sheldon Press on 18 May and is available priced at £9.99.